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20121222
20121230
STATION
KQED (PBS) 26
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the s&p sectors moved lower on the selloff, energy fell by more than 1% and so did financials and telecom services that sector was weighed down by big losses in blackberry maker research in motion. more on that in a moment. today's selling came despite some encouraging economic reports. durable goods orders rose 0.7% in november, a slight decline had been expected. personal spending also picked up in november, rising 0.4% of a percent as consumers shrugged off worries about the fiscal cliff and went shopping. as investors sold stocks, they bought up safe-havens like treasuries and gold. that pushed down the yield on the ten-year treasury to 1.77% yields move in the opposite direction of treasury prices. meanwhile, gold was shining up over $14 to $1,660 an ounce. there were some deals getting done today. first up, general electric. it's buying the aeronautics unit of italian engine maker avio. the price tag: $4 billion. g.e. shares fell slightly on the deal, down 17-cents to $20.88. also today, a deal in the casino space: pinnacle entertainment is buying ameri-star casinos for
but need more capital to get to the next level. exploration and production companies and energy that have done well and need capital. you can raise it or you can join forces with somebody else. very often the decision is to merge and not raise capital and take that risk. >> susie: and in tech what should they look for. tech is such a huge area we have a few seconds left what are your thoughts? >> look at the base companiesan. the kind of service that's county of victoria to their -- o their base line services. >> thanks bob, have a greatweek. bob pr profusek. >> susie: the price of gold fell slightly today, as the fiscal cliff drama in washington continues to weigh on markets and confidence. gold slipped almost $8 to $1,655. for the year, gold is up about 5%, half the gain in the s&p 500. but as erika miller reports, some gold bugs believe next year will be far better for the precious metal. >> reporter: if you got gold jewelry as a holiday gift, it may be more than something beautiful to wear. it may also prove to be a shining investment. some gold traders think the yellow metal could hi
, a netherlands based company, no in the medical business but in the energy business. explain why you like this multinational. >> yes, tom, sound like it belongs in the medical business, but actually no it's really a science business. core labs, about a $5 billion company and they specialize in helping oil companies find more oil and more gas that benefits all around the world. so they have scientists who actually take samples of rock and water, analyze that and try to help oil companies find more oil that may be hidden or tucked away so we can abscess more oil, which is good for all of us. >> tom: we're talking about an energy boon in the united states, energy prices, that's helped keep a cap on energy prices here. what kind of holding time frame do you anticipate to make some money? >> as we've seen this year, one reason why core labs is attractive from a valuation perfect suspective we've seen the stock soften this year as some of the rig counts have softened as well because of the i prices of natural gas have really fallen. and i do think this will reverse sometime over the next few ye
be across the board for everybody and, in the energy area, if take really come down hard on fracking which has been a very important asset for our country. >> all right, sorry we have to leave it there. an interesting conversation. thank you very much wane. best wishes for the new your. wayne kaufman of john thomas financial. thanks a lot >> susie: the fiscal cliff isn't the only drama playing out for the u.s. economy: there's also the "container cliff". 14 ports along the u.s. east and gulf coasts are at risk of closing if longshoremen and the international maritime alliance cannot reach a deal by saturday. federal mediators have been called in to help with last minute negotiations. at the heart of the dispute: container royalties. those fees charged to shippers were implemented in the 1960s to help dock workers displaced by technology. the maritime alliance wants the royalties capped. earlier this month a port strike in southern california, cost an estimated $1 billion a day. netflix is blaming problems at its web service provider, amazon for a server outage that took down its streaming
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
grassroots energy that got them out. i think college students were a big part of the win for prop 30. the fact that the current year's budget was built assuming that 30 was going to pass and that if it didn't, there were going to be trigger cuts that were going to cut into the higher education budget, really motivated a lot of students out. so, brown moves forward with that momentum. >> i really feel like that's kind of the nub of it. there was a huge component of fear involved, and well-based fear involved in the prop 30 campaign. it seemed like it finally got through to people that a tremendous percentage of the state budget is dedicated to k-12 and higher education and you can only cut so far, and we had come to that point without impacting those sections of the budget. >> what i think is so fascinating, tyche, about the passage of that, is people were scared, people voted, they decided it was worth -- even though they didn't trust the legislature, it was worth giving them more money. but we've been talking in the media for the last ten years about how california is broke, there's
speech at the democratic national convention injected energy and enthusiasm into the voters. >> herman cain was the leading republican contender. however, he was also the worst politician, but i'll get to that later. >> i had a long shot in naming chris christie because he firmed up his base in a democratic state. and i think at a time when the republicans now are seeing a resurgence among their moderates. i think in the long run he may prove to be the big winner of the year. >> these are all very interesting choices but they are all domestic. the best politician of 2012 was german chancellor angela merkle. she had to walk a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking points by the cia. she went on a defensive. and president obama left her, john, twisting slowly, slowly in the wind. she's gone. >> she'll still be our u.n. ambassador, though, pat. i give worst politician to mitt romn
flight. >> and harn es -- harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> the people of boeing are looking to tomorrow to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by -- prudential financial. additional funding is provided by the annenburg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. 2012 was a remarkable year one that was shaped by other exploration of america's essential divide, red vs. blue, yes. but also red vs. red. congress vs. the white house and when it came to foreign policy, whether and how to intervene. we begin, of course, with election 2012. >> thank you, new hampshire. tonight we made history. he is the worst republican in the country to put up against barack obama. >> if you've got a business, you didn't build that. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planets. my promise is to help you and your family. >> when
is doing to you at that moment? are you simply taking it in, that's where the energy and that's where clearly the direction comes from the score. >> yeah, absolutely, yeah. it's the music. it's the music. i study a lot, really. and i'm studying all-- . >> rose: study what. >> you know, i love to go deeply in music. >> when you study the dor what are you looking for? what is if that speaks to you? >> what speaks to me? well,. >> is it knowing where the computers head was? what he was or she, what he was thinking at the moment s it getting to what might have been at the moment that that note was taken from this head and this heart and put there on that page? >> you start to think from that point. but at the send, remember that you are recreating. you are recreating, so sometimes let's put the example of the beethoven. beethoven is a kpotser very difficult to approach because you have let's say rules in david tobin music. you have to use a small orchestra. you have a very special kind of sound to approach. but at the end there is subjective because i'm sure that beethoven at his time, he
before he died with full energy though he was incredibly frail. he said to a friend, i should have run a national theater. that's what i should have done with my life. >> charlie: (laughing) did it impact his writing? >> in fact... charlie: simon. his writing is a performance. charlie: exactly. you feel more than you do with any other great writer in the presence of the author you feel him doing it for you, wanting your admiration for the virs yosity of the different voices that he employs. even the passages are like great arias. it's all a performance. >> his daughter reported that she saw him standing in front of a mirror and acting something out. he asked her about it. he gave her a very interesting answer. he said, well, if you asked someone to list the ways in which an old man walks he might think of eight or ten things but a decent actor is imitating 100 mowings. he would rush to his desk after acting out and write down what he had just done. the acting and the writing were won. snairlts robert, you were going to add what? >> don't talk about it. do it. that's what's he used to s
elbaradei. he is the former head of the international atomic energy agency and a nobel peace prize winner. . >> ifill: thank you for joinings us. you called egypt to reject the -- what's recan to how it turned out? >> it is going to pass but it's a sad day in my view for egypt because it is going to institutionalize stability, very polarizing charter, defines a lot of the basic human value like treatment woman of religion, freedom of expression, so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health
, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted home.th >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well attended.li literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i think people want to be together. they want to be talking to people.ton >> brown: the crisis around here, she says, rarely makes it into her poetry in an explicit way. but she did have one direct hit for us, a playful work-in- progress called "austerity measures." >> i love the term "austerity measures." it sounds so poetic. >> brown: even though it's so" real, nitty-gritty in what's happening here? >> yes, i love the idea of "measures" as, you know, verse. it was prompted by a headline that i read somewhere, which w
this creative power you have, creative energy, have an outlet anywhere other than film? you will argue criticism and i'll take that, but what else? i mean, do you create music? >> no. >> rose: you don't create that, no. >> i appreciate it. >> rose: yeah. and you make movie movie about it. and i use it in my movies and it's a huge -- >> rose: it is. it's a defining part of your-- >> i agree. but i don't make it. >> rose: so what does that make you a kind of agigator? requesthere is modern art going on, there is-- for lack of a better word-- hip-hop aesthetic, taking what you like that already existed expz putting it in your own work and the way you do it, the way you create it, something that didn't exist before. it took a while to be respected but that's where i've been coming from. >> rose: how do you use it? how does it add to the film? personally i think -- >> rose: it creates mood? it creates-- >> well, i think it's one of the most-- i try not to use music just as a case of pacing. that's how everybody else does it. they put innocuous music for the ticking clock. but i think the reason that
. they enjoy too cook. it's more of a -- it's like a sport in a sense. there's an energy the kitchen. there's team work, it's demanding and there's timing. everything for a table of six has to come up at the same time. >> i think it's more like war than a sport. >> rose: what do you mean war? >> well, off sense -- we talk about being in the trenches and it's highly pressured it's intense and doesn't stop until it's over. it's not like a sport where you can say i played two sets of tennis, i'm out of here. >> you work like a team. >> it's the same athletic ability of moving the pots, many times i feel like i felt when i used to play football. you're getting -- your adrenaline is flowing because tables are coming in and there's a famous person out there and a personality out there. so it's an exciting profession. >> we all share the responsibility to motivate. >> rose: to motivate the people around you. >> exactly. and we need the pressure to be able to move on. if the restaurant -- we are not warmed up and when the restaurant is full then everything goes fine. >> new york's vibrant, boistero
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)